Category Archives: Crisis Loans

Crisis loans, information on applying for and getting a crisis loan form the department of work and pensions delivered by the jobcentre plus

What maternity benefits am I entitled to?

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As a pregnant lady, you have the right to be granted a maternity leave. There are also other benefits that accompany the maternity leave including maternity allowances which you receive from the Department - we are not affiliated with any organisation mentioned. for Work and Pension. If you are employed, your employer should give you Statutory Maternity Pay. Also, during your pregnancy, you receive free prescriptions and dental care. Some people can join a government scheme known as the Healthy Start.

Here is a summary of maternity benefits in the UK:

The right to a maternity leave

The right to a maternity leave is your basic right as a pregnant woman. Your employer is supposed to allow you a maternity leave of up to 52 weeks regardless of whether you are eligible for a Statutory Maternity Pay. You should note that the period you have worked for the company or organization does not determine if you are entitled or the number of weeks you have. You can start the leave 11 weeks before the birth of the child.

Statutory Maternity Pay

This is a 39-week pay that the employer should give you if you have work for him or her for a period of 26 weeks before the fifteenth week when the baby is due. For the first 6 weeks, you get 90% of your weekly normal earnings. For the rest of the remaining weeks, you get either £140.98 per week or 90% of the average weekly salary you earn. You can get the SMP as early as 11 weeks before childbirth.

Maternity Allowance

If you are not eligible for Statutory Maternity Pay, your employer provides you with an SMP1 form which enables you to claim maternity allowance. To get this allowance, you must have been self-employed or worked for an organization for at least 26 weeks during the 66 weeks of your pregnancy up to a week before childbirth and earned an average of £30 in 13 weeks. You claim the allowance from the gov.uk website or Jobcentre Plus office.

Sure Start Maternity Grant

This is a sum of £500 that helps low-income people to be able to buy things for their newborn. You can claim the money as from the eleventh week when the baby is due up to the third month of the baby. You may get the grant if your partner is disabled, not employed, or gets any other kind of income support. There are other Maternity Grants too.

Prescriptions and dental care

You are eligible for free prescription and dental care if you are pregnant. You apply for a certificate which is signed by the doctor which is usually valid for the period you are pregnant and a year later.

Healthy Start Scheme

This is a governmental program the gives vouchers to pregnant ladies worth £3.10. They can be used to buy milk, infant milk formula, fruits and vegetables and vitamin supplements. Pregnant ladies who are under 18 years of age and children between the age of 1 to 4 can apply.

Department - we are not affiliated with any organisation mentioned. Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Maternity Grant (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 509 2417
Statutory Maternity Pay (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 902 8133
Social Fund (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 506 0283
Crisis Loan (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 509 2336
Jobcentre Appointments (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 509 2322
Job Seeker’s Allowance Claims (New Claims & Existing) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 509 2383
Employment & Support Allowance (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 509 2374
Income Support (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 509 2374
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 504 0374
Universal Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 509 2382
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 509 2382
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 504 9433
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges) 0843 509 2380

Bring back the Social Fund

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Before the Government decided to scrap the Social Fund, people and their families had a place to turn when they found that they were without income (often through no fault of their own) and could apply for a crisis loan to tide them over with money for food or gas and electricity until they were next paid.

With the roll out of the new welfare reforms that began in April 2013, and the closure of the discretionary Social Fund system people are having to find alternative ways to support themselves when without income, and with the number of adverts for payday loansharsk on the TV it is not surprising that these companies are seeing an upsurge in applications.

Payday loans ARE NOT the answer to turning around poverty as they see people fall into spiraling dept that they are unable to clear with charges, interest and other fees mounting on a daily basis.surge-in-payday-loan-search

 

The government should give real thought to brining back element of the Social Fund to help those who are tempted to apply for these short term loans. with a view to helping to end the misery of those caught in the poverty trap.

crisis-loanhelp

Local Welfare Provision to Replace Crisis Loans

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With the end of the Social Fund following the introduction of the new welfare reform bill, those who would previously applied to the social fund for financial assistance in times of emergency are now finding it ever more difficult to work out who to turn to in a disaster.

Historically, anyone who lived in the UK and was classed as being habitually resident in the United Kingdom was able to apply for a Crisis Loan from the Government to pay for food and fuel if they had no money, and no other means of support. Crisis Loans were a part of the Discretionary social fund and were typically, interest free same day payments of up to £1500 that could be applied for and decided over the telephone, however the New Welfare Reform bill has seen the Crisis Loan provision scrapped and replaced with Local Welfare Provision.

Local Welfare assistance is provided by Councils, and Local authorities across the UK and is funded by grants from Central Government in much the same way as the Social fund used to be, but there is a catch- Local Authorities have been given virtual autonomy over the criteria that would make an applicant eligible for a cash loan, in addition to how the assistance is delivered.

Whilst most Councils still offer cash loans at times of crisis, some have adopted food vouchers. Birmingham City Council announced last week that they will be offering pre paid ASDA top up cards in place of cash payments from 24/5/2013, and that applications for help with Gas and Electricity top-up meters will be provided by PayPoint top ups at the Council Office in an effort to reduce the number of people applying for a Crisis Loan and using the money for unintended items or services.

If you are awaiting a new claim to income based benefit including Jobseekers Allowance, Income Support, Employment Support Allowance or Pension Credit, you may be able to still apply to parts of the discretionary Social Fund.

Although the majority of Crisis Loan payments have been devolved to Local Authorities, some elements of the scheme remain under the control of the Department - we are not affiliated with any organisation mentioned. for Work and Pensions, these include budgeting Advances and Short Term Benefit Advances.

Budgeting Advance if the name given to the replacement for the old Budgeting Loan scheme that used to provide larger loans to people who were on benefits and who were finding it difficult to save up for larger items. The new scheme is virtually identical to the previous scheme in that, to apply you need to have been claiming an income based benefit for the last 26 weeks, and you are limited to the maximum loan amount of £1500.

Short Term Benefit Advances are the new payments that have replaced a specific set of Crisis Loans call Alignment to Benefit Loans, these were paid in advance of applications being processed for the main benefits and were designed to ensure that those waiting for the first payments of benefit were not without income. Short term Benefit Advances are paid in the same way as alignment Crisis Loans, however you can only get them if you directly ask for one at the point of making a claim, or advising of a change in your income.

You can read more about the Crisis Loan scheme at Crisis Loan Help or you can find out about either the STBA or Budgeting Advance schemes Budgeting Advance

 

Crisis Loan Appeal

This site offers advice and call forwarding options, and we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this website. Calls to 084 numbers cost up to 7p per minute plus your network access charge.

If you have applied for a Crisis Loan for living expenses or for help with rent in advance and have been refused the loan then you can appeal, and in most cases have a good chance of the decision being overturned in your favour.

The rules around crisis loans are pretty clear, and there are some rules that you will not be able to get around for example if you already owe more than £1500.00 to the social fund then your crisis loan application will be turned down, and although you can appeal, your appeal will not be successful as the law state stat you can not owe more than £1500.00 at a time.

However if you have been turned down due to the way they the decision maker has interpreted your application ( the discretionary part of the process )that you can ask for the decision to be looked at again.

 

The appeal process:

The process that you must go through if turned down for a Crisis loan is split into two parts.

  1. The Review- This is when you disagree with the decision, and must be done in writing and is when another Decision Maker ( The reviewing officer) looks at your application and makes a new decision based on the evidence supplied, and also checks that the original decision is correct in fact and law. the best way to ask for a review is to fax a letter stating your reasons to the Benefits Centre from your local Jobcentre. The process should take 48 hours.
  2. An Independent Review: This is the step after you were turned down initially AND have already been turned down by the reviewing officer. If you have been told by the reviewing officer that they can not change the decision that all you need to do is ask that they refer your appeal to The Independent Review service who will take a 3rd look at your crisis loan appeal and again see if the law has been applied correctly- HOWEVER the IRS tend to side with the customer as they state  that ” The customer has the right to be believed” so if you were turned down because the decision maker did not believe what you were saying, but could not prove otherwise then the IRS are more than likely to overturn the decision when you appeal.

Crisis Loans Reduce to 30% April 2012

This site offers advice and call forwarding options, and we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this website. Calls to 084 numbers cost up to 7p per minute plus your network access charge.
  • the maximum rate for daily living expenses available to non-householders (other than those who are homeless) will reduce from 60% to 30% of the personal allowance rate (see paras 3-21)
  • Crisis Loans awarded to alleviate hardship because Child Tax Credit (CTC) has not yet been received will be treated as alignment payments (see paras 22-25).

 

Note: The changes detailed in this bulletin are the only ones that have been agreed. No other aspects of the CL scheme are changing from 9th April.

1. Amendments have been made to:

  • Secretary of State Direction 14C, 18, and 20
  • Secretary of State Guidance: Part I – Introduction, Part 03 – Crisis Loans and Part 8 – The Directions
  • Social Fund Procedural Guide Part 01, Part 05A and Part 05B.

The amended directions are attached at Annex 1.

Reduction in maximum rate of Crisis Loan for living expenses for some applicants

 

2. From 9th April 2012 the maximum amount for a CL living expense award will be either 60% or 30% of

  • the appropriate Income Support personal allowance rate for the customer and partner, or
  • the appropriate Jobseekers Allowance hardship rate (JSA hardship cases).

 

Remember that in some cases where a sanction applies the couple rate may not apply (see Direction 18(5)).

 

3. The circumstances in which the 60% rate and the 30% rate will apply are set out below.

60% maximum rate (householders and the homeless)

 

4. The 60% rate will apply in the following circumstances:

  • the applicant or their partner has an award of housing benefit (HB) or council tax benefit (CTB) in respect of their home, or
  • the applicant or their partner is liable for one of the following

– rent

– hostel or board and lodging charges, or

– council tax (or would be liable if the dwelling were not exempt)

in respect of their home and has not been refused housing benefit or council tax benefit on any ground other than exceeding the income or capital limits, or

 

  • the applicant or their partner is liable for mortgage payments, or in relation to Scotland, payments under heritable securities, or
  • the applicant is a person without accommodation. (Note that the 60% rate does not apply to people who have no fixed address and who move from one address to another staying with different people.)

30% maximum rate (non-householders, excluding the homeless)

 

5. The 30% rate will apply where the applicant and partner, where they have one, normally reside in the home of a relative, friend or other person and do not meet the conditions for the 60% maximum rate set out above. (Note: this includes people who have no fixed address but move from one address to another staying with different people, but does not apply to a person without accommodation.)

Evidence

 

6. In most cases, it will be clear which maximum rate applies from the information provided by the applicant as part of the standard application process and further enquiries will not need to be made. For example if it is clear that there is no-one else living in the same household as the applicant the DM will not need to check the applicant’s household status. Paragraphs 8 to 19 set out the relevant factors in considering which maximum rate applies and the evidence which DMs may need to obtain in a range of circumstances.

Liability for rent, hostel or board and lodging charges or council tax benefit

7. Where the applicant states that they are liable for rent, hostel/board and lodging charges or Council tax, first ask whether they or their partner have claimed and been awarded HB or CTB for this address.

8. For information about whether an HB claim has been made, use the Where you Live screen on

– JA dialogue 501: JSA Claim Details Enquiry

– IS dialogue 500 : Enquiry Evidence

9. If HB has been awarded the 60% maximum rate will apply. If there is any reason to doubt the applicant’s word ask them to supply further evidence before considering a 60% award. (See paragraph 18 for more details)

10. If an HB claim has been refused ask the applicant to say what reasons were given for the refusal. If this was for any reason other than excess income or capital the 30% maximum amount rate will apply. If the HB claim has been refused because of excess income or capital the 60% maximum amount rate will apply, if you are satisfied that they are liable for rent, hostel/board and lodging charges or Council tax. DMs should not attempt to obtain information about HB claims directly from LAs.

11. If the applicant states that they are liable for rent, board and lodging charges or hostel charges and a claim for HB or CTB has been made but not decided, the DM should ask them to provide supporting evidence, by providing sight of the tenancy agreement with their landlord (See paragraph 19). DMs should note that although a written contract is not required for such an agreement to exist, few landlords are prepared to rely on an oral agreement.

Home Owners with a mortgage

12. To check whether the applicant or partner has a mortgage, use the Home Loan screen on:

– JA dialogue 501: JSA Claim Details Enquiry

– IS dialogue 500 : Enquiry Evidence

13. Where there is no mortgage, check whether the applicant or partner has claimed CTB using CIS dialogue 110: Award History.

14. If a CL applicant or partner has not made a claim for Income Support, income-related Employment and Support Allowance or income-based Jobseekers Allowance and states that they are liable for mortgage payments or payments under heritable securities see paragraph 18, 3rd, 4th and 6th bullet points, for details of other evidence which it may be appropriate to ask the applicant to provide.

People who are living rent free or mortgage free

15. The 60% rate applies to applicants who are not paying rent or a mortgage because, for example, they have paid their mortgage off, but who are responsible for Council Tax (or would be if the dwelling was not exempt). If necessary, confirm responsibility for Council Tax for the residence. Note that some homes are exempt from Council Tax, e.g. Armed Forces accommodation or a self-contained annex to the home of a relative. Where the applicant or partner has a current exemption notice from the Local Authority, the 60% rate still applies.

Persons without accommodation

16. The 60% rate will also apply to applicants who have no home at all, known as Persons without accommodation (PWAs), see Direction 18(6)(b). This means those applicants who are homeless and sleep rough on the streets or on park benches, not those who have no fixed address and frequently move from one address to another, staying with friends.

Asking the applicant to provide further supporting information

17. Where there is any doubt, applicants should be able to show their or their partner’s responsibility for housing costs by providing a tenancy or mortgage agreement and in the absence of such an agreement information about one or more of the following as appropriate:

  • the landlord or landlord’s agent to whom rent is due;
  • the landlord or organisation to whom commercial board and lodging or hostel charges are due;
    • the lender to whom a mortgage is due;
    • the Council tax bill for the residence or any current exemption notification;
    • any current Housing Benefit award (the DM will sometimes need to see the refusal of an HB or CTB application);
    • any current Council Tax Benefit award.

18. If the DM is satisfied that the applicant qualifies for a CL but it is still not clear which maximum rate applies and where there is insufficient time to clarify this e.g. by the applicant providing supporting evidence, the DM should consider making an award based on the 30% maximum rate. If further evidence subsequently comes to light which shows that the applicant satisfies the conditions for the 60% maximum rate the DM should review the application and if appropriate make a revised award based on the 60% maximum rate.

SFCS Action

19. The Social Fund Computer System (SFCS) will continue to display the 60% rate in dialogue 131. The desk aid contained in the appendix to Part 5A of the SF Procedural Guidance will be updated with off line calculations for both the 60% and the 30% rate. This is shown in advance at Annex 2. DMs should note that there are separate tables showing the 60% rate and the 30% rate respectively. In all cases where the 30% rate applies the DM must overwrite the maximum award amount in dialogue 131153: Living Expenses Decision. This will either be with the 30% rate from the desk aid or a lower figure based on the applicant’s circumstances. Remember to use the correct reason for offer code:

  • 26 for full award
  • 32 for maximum award

Telephone scripts

20. Telephone scripts will be amended to ensure that relevant information is gathered to enable a decision to be made on the rate to pay.

 

Alignment Payments

21. What counts as an alignment payment has been amended. The types of CL award that count as an alignment payment on or after 9th April 2012 are as follows:

  • an income-replacement benefit has been claimed but has not yet been decided or an award has been made but full benefit entitlement is not in payment, or
  • CTC has been claimed but either a decision has not been made or an award has been made but is not in payment, or
  • employment has begun after a period on an income-related benefit but first payment of earnings has not yet been received

and, as a consequence, the applicant needs help with living expenses in the meantime.

 

22. In CTC renewal cases the customer is likely to know when they last received CTC, giving a good indicator of when the next payment is due. For new claims to CTC DMs should establish whether the applicant has requested weekly or 4-weekly payments of CTC. DMs may consider restricting the period of the CL award to a maximum of 7 days and advise the applicant to make prompt contact with HMRC to enquire about an emergency payment if the CTC claim is not decided within that time span.

 

23. DMs should note that CL awards made in the circumstances set out in paragraph 22 will not count towards the 3 in 12 restriction.

 

SFCS action

 

24. As for all alignment cases, these applications must be recorded on SFCS using Application Purpose Code 06 (Alignment – period before first payday).

 

Reviews

25. When reviewing applications made on or after 9th April 2012, apply the rules set out in the new and revised Directions. If reviewing applications made prior to this date use the rules in the previous Directions.

 

26. The previous Secretary of State’s Directions and Guidance on Crisis Loans are still available in the Social Fund Guide for use when reviewing applications made before 9th April 2012.

Telephone scripts

Crisis Loans- Closed at Christmas

This site offers advice and call forwarding options, and we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this website. Calls to 084 numbers cost up to 7p per minute plus your network access charge.

The Social Find sections will be open as usual for most of the Christmas period, so if you need a loan you can still call the crisis loans telephone number and apply.

However due to public holidays and the fact that all jobcentre plus offices will be closed it is better not to ring on the following days

Monday 26 December
Tuesday 27 December
Wednesday 28 December

As far as we understand the will be an out of hours emergency service available for people who need loans over the Christmas period from the social fund whilst they are closed.

Our advice would be to call the normal number, and if you are not given advice on what to do next, then go to your local police station and ask if they can help- the police should have telephone numbers for social services, or the designated contact of the social fund in your area and they should be able to help.

Crisis loans for help with Rent

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Crisis Loans for rent

Given the recent economic crisis, many people are finding that they are falling behind on rent payemnts or that they are no longer able to afford the rent at the property that they live at and this is causing an increase in the number of people allplying to the government run social find crisis loans section for help with rent payments.

However due to the fact that the Social fund was set up long before the recent crisis, there is no provision for help with paying off rent arrears as part of the scheme.

Although some people may still be able to get som ehelp with rent if it is for a new tennancy, that has had to be taken out due to health and safety risks ast the old address.

This type of application is called a rent in advance crisis loan and can either be applied for in writing is you expect to move in several weeks or over the telephone if you are planning on moving in the next couple of days.

Read more HERE

How much was paid in social fund crisis loans

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To get an understanding of how much was paid out in crisis loans in the last year he have found the following figures

The information is as follows:

2010-11
Region Budget a rea November December January February March
East Midlands East Midlands North 5,522 4,753 6,610 5,894 5,598
South East Midlands 7,298 6,210 8,019 6,823 6,933
East of England Essex 5,231 4,604 5,408 4,960 5,389
Norwich BDC 10,373 8,848 10,083 10,997 10,363
London Central and East London 5,207 4,489 5,772 5,032 5,154
London South 8,157 7,000 9,468 8,572 8,862
North and North East London 4,730 4.178 5,319 4,956 4,755
West London 4,052 3,596 4,714 4,269 4,342
North East Northumbria 4,240 4,183 4,981 4,651 5,409
South Tyne and Wear Valley 5,342 4,713 5,575 6.345 6.198
Tees Valley 4,420 4,064 4,455 5,000 4,714
North West Chorlton BDC 24,331 20,195 26,927 24,068 25,034
Greater Liverpool and Cheshire 13,695 11,520 15,342 13,726 14,402
Scotland Inverness BDC 9,151 8,118 11,575 8,330 8,880
Springburn BDC 19,358 19,016 24,317 19,801 20,676
South East SE BOBS 6,608 6,115 8,708 8,506 8,431
SE HIKYS 14,110 14,029 17,862 16,801 17,088
South West South West Central 12,649 10,334 13,640 14,722 14,341
Wales Llanelli BDC 3,736 3,283 3,682 4,052 3,731
South East Wales 8,119 6,730 8,057 8,226 8,192
West Midlands West Midlands SF 17,426 15,392 22,963 19,541 20,854
Yorkshire and Humberside Bradford 5,359 4,981 6,410 6,107 5,931
Sheffield 13,039 11,097 16,237 15,115 14,262
Total 212,153 187,448 246,124 226,494 229,539
2011-12
Region Budget a rea April May June July August September October
East Midlands East Midlands North 4,059 4,936 4,883 4,983 5,095 4,943 4,435
South East Midlands 5,544 6,312 6,364 5,718 5,942 5,917 5,071
East of England Essex 3,690 4,382 4,250 3,994 3,759 3,827 3,300
Norwich BDC 7,742 8,872 8,859 8,057 7,876 8,061 7,127
London Central and East London 3,727 4,508 4,178 4,157 3,930 4,055 3,315
London South 6,495 7,404 6,921 6,778 6,482 6,985 6,075
North and North East London 3,519 4,323 4,225 4,102 3,974 3,952 3,539
West London 3,219 3,599 3.408 3,492 3,352 3,418 2,990
North East Northumbria 3,648 3,985 3,919 4,321 3,978 3,861 3,752
South Tyne and Wear Valley 4,157 4,709 4,437 4,645 4,310 4,250 3,817
Tees Valley 3,229 3,284 3,137 3,258 3,221 3,351 2,898
North West Chorlton BDC 18,559 24,199 21,008 19,638 19,461 19,062 16,578
Greater Liverpool and Cheshire 10,345 11,905 11,285 10,948 10,992 11,405 9,807
Scotland Inverness BDC 6,400 8,076 8,594 7,154 7,179 6,966 6,532
Springburn BDC 14,779 17,486 17,548 15.913 16,250 15,983 14,024
South East SE BOBS 5,424 6,310 6,190 5,305 6,258 6,813 6,021
SE HIKYS 11,950 13,765 12,934 11,578 12,641 13,580 12,157
South West South West Central 10,058 12,337 11,254 10,727 11,096 10,483 9,434
Wales Llanelli BDC 2,780 3,019 2,985 2,940 3,046 3,134 2,664
South East Wales 6,061 6,548 6,422 6.318 6,497 6,767 5,757
West Midlands West Midlands SF 14,894 17,222 16,780 16,716 16,520 16,836 15,031
Yorkshire and Humberside Bradford 4,432 5,232 5,269 4,834 5,081 5,206 4,644
Sheffield 10,061 11,649 11,389 11,032 11,349 11,630 10,324
Total 164,772 194,062 186,239 176,608 178,289 180,485 159,292
Notes: 1. Figures are based on the number of initial awards. 2. Figures are from November 2010-11 to October 2011-12. 3. BDC—Benefit Delivery Centre. 4. BOBS—Berkshire, Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Surrey. 5. HIKYS—Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Kent and Sussex.

Changes to Crisis Loan rules

This site offers advice and call forwarding options, and we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this website. Calls to 084 numbers cost up to 7p per minute plus your network access charge.

Changes to the Crisis Loan rules are being introduced from 4 April 2011, which will help to control expenditure, reduce abuse of the system and ensure funds are used for those in genuine need.

The three planned changes to the Crisis Loan system will mean that the Department - we are not affiliated with any organisation mentioned. will:

  • No longer pay Crisis Loans for items – cookers, beds for example. Rent in advance, charges for board and lodging, accommodation and residential charges for hostels are the only exceptions to this. There will be continuing support from the Community Care Grant scheme for people who meet the qualifying conditions
  • Customers not eligible for a Community Care Grant will be considered for a Crisis Loan if there has been a disaster impacting themselves or their household, such as flooding
  • Reduce the daily rate paid for living expenses from 75 percent down to 60 percent of benefit rate. This will align with the position for Jobseeker’s Allowance cases paid at the hardship rate
  • Restrict Crisis Loan awards for living expenses in a rolling twelve-month period to a maximum of three. This policy was tested by Jobcentre Plus in 2009/10
  • Since 2006, the number of Crisis Loan awards has tripled and continues to grow, largely independent of the recession. The changes to the Crisis Loan scheme from April will help to manage demand back towards pre-2006 levels.

This will ensure funding for Community Care Grants is protected and that DWP is able to pay Budgeting Loans throughout the year. Without these measures, Budgeting Loans would need to be withdrawn before Christmas. This would leave significant numbers of people on low incomes with little alternative but to turn to high-cost or illegal lending.

Social Fund Contact Telephone Number

This site offers advice and call forwarding options, and we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this website. Calls to 084 numbers cost up to 7p per minute plus your network access charge.

The Social Fund Contact Telephone Number for the crisis loans sections has recently changed, for those of you that don’t know, the crisis loan telephone service (same day applications for living expenses) is run on a virtual network- this means that your call could be answered by any Benefit Centre dealing with social fund telephone calls in the UK.

Although the previous Social Fund Contact Telephone Number remains active for 3 months, your should Now call 08000 327952

Social Fund Contact Telephone

Previously all offices had their own 0800 contact number, however, as of this month, there is one national social fund number for same day applications.

As before the DWP have made it difficult to find ( 6 pages into the direct gov site!) so here it is – 08000 327952

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