If you have applied for a Crisis Loan for living expenses or for help with rent in advance and have been refused the loan then you can appeal, and in most cases have a good chance of the decision being overturned in your favour.

The rules around crisis loans are pretty clear, and there are some rules that you will not be able to get around for example if you already owe more than £1500.00 to the social fund then your crisis loan application will be turned down, and although you can appeal, your appeal will not be successful as the law state stat you can not owe more than £1500.00 at a time.

However if you have been turned down due to the way they the decision maker has interpreted your application ( the discretionary part of the process )that you can ask for the decision to be looked at again.

 

The appeal process:

The process that you must go through if turned down for a Crisis loan is split into two parts.

  1. The Review- This is when you disagree with the decision, and must be done in writing and is when another Decision Maker ( The reviewing officer) looks at your application and makes a new decision based on the evidence supplied, and also checks that the original decision is correct in fact and law. the best way to ask for a review is to fax a letter stating your reasons to the Benefits Centre from your local Jobcentre. The process should take 48 hours.
  2. An Independent Review: This is the step after you were turned down initially AND have already been turned down by the reviewing officer. If you have been told by the reviewing officer that they can not change the decision that all you need to do is ask that they refer your appeal to The Independent Review service who will take a 3rd look at your crisis loan appeal and again see if the law has been applied correctly- HOWEVER the IRS tend to side with the customer as they state  that ” The customer has the right to be believed” so if you were turned down because the decision maker did not believe what you were saying, but could not prove otherwise then the IRS are more than likely to overturn the decision when you appeal.